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Austen Roberson

Austen Roberson

Hometown: Columbia, MD

high school: Howard HS

college: MIT

MAJOR: Aerospace Engineering

Austen Roberson was raised in Columbia, MD., between Baltimore and Washington DC. He attends Howard High School in Ellicott City where he ranks first in his class of 407 students. Having never met his father, Austen grew up in a single parent household with his mother Kim, sister Awdae, his grandmother and great-grandmother. His sister taught him the value of compromise and teamwork. As southern women who lived through the Civil Rights era, his grandmother and great-grandmother imparted wisdom and empathy. “You are destined for greatness” was his mother’s constant mantra. She instilled his drive to achieve and pursue new heights. Every day, Austen strives to be the greatest he can be in all ways possible.

In school, Austen is involved in many extracurricular activities. He was a trumpeter in his school’s concert band for seven years. He served as third chair and participated in all county Honor’s Band. As a sophomore and junior, Austen was the starting Power Forward for Varsity Basketball. He helps guide freshman through the arduous transition into high school as a Howard LEO. As Vice President of National Honors Society, Austen is responsible for organizing all service projects. He has organized a donation drive for the armed forces, where students donated and packaged materials to be shipped overseas. Austen is an active member of the Alpha Achievers organization, a group of high achieving African-American males focused on mentorship and academic excellence. As a part of this group, Austen mentors younger students. Having been a mentee through the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization, Austen recognizes the importance of displaying academic excellence, service, and high moral standards to others that he now mentors.

Academically, Austen excels in an accelerated Aerospace Engineering program. He has designed and built competition rockets, cargo aircraft, gliders, and trains. For his accomplishments, he was awarded the AP + PLTW Student Achievement in Engineering. He also wAs a result of this and other educational accomplishments, Austen was recognized as an AP Scholar with Distinction and National Merit Commended Scholar.

Austen’s service also extends outside of school. He takes most pride in his fellowship with the Congressman Elijah Cummings Youth Program in Israel (ECYP). The program focuses on uplifting his Baltimore community through service and volunteerism. He also meets with Congressional officials and state legislators to discuss issues impacting his community. The organization’s primary goal is to build connections between the African American and Jewish communities, the largest minority populations in his area. As part of this experience, Austen traveled to Israel to learn more about Jewish culture and bring lessons he learned back home. ECYP hosted a teen-led Youth Social Justice Summit to educate young people about actions they can take to impact their communities. Austen led discussions about the impact of gentrification and housing justice in his community. Austen’s commitment to service has been his way to return the kindness and love shown to him growing up.

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Bethelehem Engeda

Bethelehem Engeda

Hometown: San Leandro, CA

high school: Arroyo HS

college: Stanford University

MAJOR: Computer Science

Be the change. Embodying this ideal, Bethelehem Engeda has utilized the challenges she’s endured in her life to promote advocacy and equality in her community.

Born and raised in San Leandro, California, Bethelehem grew up in a family that stressed the value of an education. As the child of hardworking Ethiopian immigrants, she – along with her younger siblings – learned the values of persistence and dedication by watching her parents tirelessly work to provide for their family. Thus, she felt inspired by her parents’ drive and funneled that motivation into excelling in her education and discovering her passions. Bethelehem is ranked at the top of her class and has achieved many academic-based awards including the Gates Scholarship, African American Regional Educational Alliances Award, and AP Scholar with Honor. However, this did not come easy. With several challenges in her life, including her father’s death from cancer and daily five-hour-long commutes for summer programs, Bethelehem has proven to be a resilient, strong young woman whose experiences have fueled her exceptional performance in academics, and her passion for creating better opportunities for her community.

As an African-American female involved in computer science, Bethelehem consistently noticed the lack of diversity and opportunity provided to those from backgrounds similar to her own. She began volunteering as a coding teacher for the organization Empower and Excel, providing free lessons on elementary programming languages to people of all ages from underprivileged communities. This has been one of the most rewarding experiences for Bethelehem, as seeing the excitement on her students’ faces and being their mentor and supporter has been her way of providing a gateway to prosperity and happiness to those who’ve faced many adversities. She also was a student in Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute, won competitions as part of Facebook’s TechSummer Virtual Reality Program, been a part of Amazon’s Girls Who Code Program, as well as other technological ventures. She has funneled all of the knowledge she has gained from these experiences to provide advice and mentorship to others hoping to pursue a career in technology.

As Head Editor of the Dry Gulch Gazette, her high school’s student-run newspaper, Bethelehem has used her role to bring awareness to important issues in her community. Of the various articles she has written, her favorite is one detailing the discrimination and loneliness African-Americans experience in the classrooms in her community. It is a topic close to her heart, as she was often the only African-American in the classes she attended, and the article was met with overwhelming praise when published. During her time as part of the newspaper’s staff, Bethelehem has also been a part of creating articles regarding LGBTQ+ rights, DACA, mental health, and more.

Bethelehem thoroughly enjoyed competing in business competitions around the nation as president of her school’s Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) chapter, being politically active in her community through rallies and marches, interning for organizations like Operation HOPE, and spending quality time with her family and friends. Bethelehem will now be attending Stanford University and be finding more ways to intersect the wonders of computer science and business through entrepreneurship, internships, and more. In the future, Bethelehem will continue to strive to be the change needed in her community and live her life by the Ron Brown philosophy.

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Chase Swinton

Chase Swinton

Hometown: Sherwood , AR

high school: Sylvan Hills HS

college: Stanford University

MAJOR: Neuroscience

At a young age, Chase learned the value of diligence from her parents who instilled within her the principles of resilience, leadership, and self-confidence. To this day, Chase still strives to model her life to fit these ideals. 

One of Chase’s long time passions is soccer. However, it was soccer that taught her about the lack of African-American representation. Rarely did she see players with puffs, braids, or twists. Nevertheless, wanting to delve further into her love of soccer, she tested for her U.S. Soccer Federation referee license; she has held this license since the age of twelve. Chase made the varsity soccer team as a freshman in high school, earning All-Conference honors. The rest of her high school soccer career she suffered multiple injuries ultimately resulting in a torn ACL. You can now find her on the soccer field as an assistant coach and manager, promoting a culture of understanding and inclusion for all young ladies.

Chase is involved in her community extensively. For her work, she has been awarded the President’s Volunteer Service Award and the George Eastman Young Leaders Award. She takes most pride in presiding as the vice president of her city’s Mayor’s Youth Council and founding her high school’s Interact Club. Furthermore, as a Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership and Rotary Youth Leadership Award Ambassador, she is well-versed in the significance of not only community service but of international service as well. In college, Chase plans to join service organizations that focus on racial and socioeconomic disparities as well as healthcare. She wants to pursue a major in public policy. Chase had the firsthand opportunity to experience public policy at work as an Arkansas Girls’ State Congressional Representative. Chase yearns to take the tools she’s learned through her service and combine them with her undergraduate studies to continue tackling issues she finds in her Arkansan community.

Additionally, Chase plans to also major in neuroscience. Her fascination with the human brain, specifically neurodegeneration, stems from her late grandmother who passed of Alzheimer’s disease. To deeply explore in her interest, Chase conducted neurobiology research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). While at UAMS, she developed an intrinsic passion for scientific research. This led her to applying for, and ultimately attending, Harvard’s Science Research Conference. Having the opportunity to learn from fellow high school researchers across the country and esteemed Harvard professors further asserted Chase’s interest in pursuing research as a neurologist, specializing in neurodegenerative diseases.

 Chase is committed to using her affinity for science and service to empower those succeeding her. She sincerely believes representation matters.

When she has some free time, Chase is an avid anime and Black Mirror binge-watcher. Chase also enjoys listening to R&B music and NPR. She’s a big fan of peppermint mocha lattes and taking photographs of scrumptious food.

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Christian Porter

Christian Porter

Hometown: Atlanta, GA

high school: Atlanta International School

college: Harvard College

MAJOR: Economics

Born in Austell, Georgia, Christian Malachy Porter was welcomed into the world by a host of health issues, ranging from severe bone and joint problems to heart problems. This not only led to the Children’s Hospital of Atlanta becoming his second home but it also created in him a feverish drive to not let the hand that life dealt him inhibit his future success.

From a young age, Christian Malachy was exposed to the importance of education and generosity. After his grandmother passed, his mother, Rowena, took in his cousin, Raymond, and raised him. This, coupled with his mother’s undying love for volunteering despite her disability, instilled a fervent desire in him to help others before himself. At four-years-old, Christian Malachy was recognized as a gifted student and given a hefty scholarship to attend Atlanta International School, a top private schools with a specialized full-immersion language program, and by second grade he was fluent in French. He continued to shine in the classroom throughout school, picking up Spanish and Latin, excelling in his STEM classes and earning a 4.4 GPA in the rigorous IB program.

Due to his health problems, swimming was the only sport he could do, and what started off as therapeutic became his biggest passion. By ten-years-old, Christian Malachy was traveling the Southeast to compete, earning accolades at the regional, state and sectional levels and bursting onto the scene as of the top age-group swimmers in Georgia. As his relationship with the sport dwindled in the latter stages of high school, Christian Malachy decided to use his love for the water to benefit his hometown community. He became heavily invested in volunteering as a summer swim coach and as a weekly swim instructor to children with Down Syndrome at his local YMCA.

As a high-schooler he was appointed to numerous leadership roles on student council and the black student union, as a student ambassador, as a captain and Academic All-American member of the most decorated swim team in school history, as well as a starting forward for varsity basketball. As a junior, along with being named a Questbridge College Prep Scholar and Finalist, Christian Malachy was recognized as one of the top minority STEM students in the nation and invited to attend the MITES program at MIT for seven weeks during the summer where he took classes and conducted research among some the nation’s brightest. It was this life-changing experience that showed Christian Malachy he was not only capable of handling the rigors of higher education, but he was ready to take college by storm.

Because of his own experiences and his desire to help others, Christian Malachy wants to pursue a dual MD-MPH degree to become a surgeon while also revitalizing American healthcare policy to improve health outcomes in marginalized communities. This fall, he will attend Harvard College on it’s world-renowned pre-med track, concentrating in Economics with a focus on Healthcare Economics and a secondary concentration in African-American Studies.

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Christine Ohenzuwa

Christine Ohenzuwa

Hometown: Blaine, MN

high school: De La Salle HS

college: Princeton University

MAJOR: Aerospace Engineering

Born to a pair of Nigerian immigrants, Christine was surrounded by the sights, sounds and traditions of a rich culture from an early age. As a result, she has always held a deep love and pride for her heritage. In addition to a love of culture, her parents instilled in her an awareness of the importance of education. Consequently, Christine grew up with an acute sense of the value of learning.

From a young age, Christine had a knack for tinkering. She enjoyed discovering how objects worked and how they interacted with the world. Her love for tinkering blossomed into a passion for STEM in high school. In her sophomore year, she and her friends created the app Pocket Pollinator. Pocket Pollinator set out to alleviate the bee crisis by collecting data from citizen scientists in a game-like format and then sending this data to research institutions for analysis; however, the most important feature of the app is the potential it holds to engage youth with the world around them. The app acts as a bridge between the natural world and technology, which seem to be so often juxtaposed against one another.

As a rising senior, Christine was selected to be a part of the MIT Online Science Technology and Engineering Community (MOSTEC). In the program, Christine took courses in Science Writing and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) that culminated in a science writing paper and a final EECS project that was presented at MIT to members of the MIT community. In addition to presenting her project, Christine also had the opportunity to meet the fellow members of her cohort. Getting to know so many intelligent and driven people of color who held the same passion for the sciences that she did inspired her and encouraged her to not be afraid to push herself academically.

Christine’s love for STEM is perhaps only rivaled by her love for her culture and writing. As a part of her parents’ cultural association, she helps organize parties that feature traditional dancing, food and clothes. She has also participated in and helped organize events in which youth create and present projects about prominent people in Edo history. She organizes these events with the hope of encouraging a sense of pride in Edo-American youth, who may feel ostracized in a predominantly Western society that often ridicules non-Western thought. Christine was able to share her own project on Edo history to a national audience through National History Day.

Christine has been involved in writing, specifically in poetry, since she was twelve years old. Through poetry, she found a way to express herself as well as relieve herself from the stresses of everyday life. Her written poetry has been featured in Canvas Literary Magazine, a national youth literary magazine, among other recognitions. She has also become increasingly involved in spoken word poetry. She believes spoken word poetry presents a unique opportunity to meld the technique of written poetry with the rhythm and social consciousness associated with hip hop culture.

In the future, Christine hopes to become an aerospace engineer and participate in breakthrough research to create practical, interdisciplinary solutions to real world problems.

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JoVoni Johnson-McCray

JoVoni Johnson-McCray

Hometown: Conway, AR

high school: Conway HS

college: Rice University

MAJOR: Economics

JoVoni Johnson has always aspired and strived to be the best at everything he does. Whether it be football, leadership, academics, or anything else, he wants to be the top. He takes extreme pride in being active and working towards change within his own community.

JoVoni played Quarterback for Conway High School in Arkansas and was the class President of Conway High. This allotted him a platform that enabled him to reach multitudes of youth throughout the entire state. With this influence in this position of power, he decided to advocate for an issue that held a special place in his heart―mental and emotional health and decisions related thereof. This led to him becoming part of the Choosing to Excel Youth Leadership Team; serving as Vice President and Public Relations Officer. In this nonprofit organization, JoVoni thrived in educating youth on the transition to high school and healthy decision making in all aspects. Through this program, JoVoni has advocated annually for the past three years to state and national legislators. On Capitol Hill, he lobbied to increase Title V funding to improve the amount of sex health education received by students in Arkansas.

With no shortage of accolades, JoVoni has earned the titles of National Merit Finalist, Rotary Youth Leadership Award winner, three year letterman All-State Quarterback, councilmember of Fellowship of Christian Athletes, National Honor Society member, devoted volunteer, and a proud young man that has overcome every stereotype held against him. Even in his young age, he is knowledgeable of his accomplishments and the weight they carry, however he is not satisfied, but rather determined to reach further for excellence. Throughout his life, there have been challenges, successes, sacrifices, and hardships that have all molded him into who he is today. His biggest motivation, support, and influence have all come from his mother. At a young age, being able to see the value in working hard and the sacrifices she made, pushed him to reciprocate that in his life and has manifested itself in his determination. Without the struggles or the support cast surrounding him, JoVoni would not have been able to make it this far in life. Shaped since his childhood, the values of hard work, dependability, conviction, and commitment have been the most important to him.

JoVoni plans to major in Economics with a History minor. This will provide a base for him to continue into Law School. In his career he hopes to become a part of the policymaking process in some area so that he can continue to represent minority groups and advocate to resolve issues that plague the marginalized population.

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Kahmile Whitby

Kahmile Whitby

Hometown: Norfolk, VA

high school: Norview HS

college: MIT

MAJOR: Mechanical Engineering

Kahmile Whitby was born into a family with three absentee fathers between him and his four siblings. Early on, his family moved frequently between apartments and homeless shelters. At age four, Kahmile, his three brothers, and sister came to live with their Grandfather, whose wife passed due to breast cancer that very morning, and their uncle. Though life improved for Kahmile and his siblings, the great responsibility of caring for five children proved incompatible with his Grandfather’s work schedule, causing him to lose his job. Soon, several other predicaments further complicated life at home. Despite this, the Christian faith Kahmile developed in his new home has always grounded him, made him more thankful, and has been a constant source of joy, strength, and peace.

While enrolled in the gifted program in middle school, Kahmile began purposefully working with his grandfather and older brother doing HVAC work to provide for the family. These experiences cultivated Kahmile’s sincere appreciation for his Grandfather’s extreme diligence and sacrifice to ensure a better future for him and his siblings. His Grandfather’s lived experiences, particularly those of oppression and his family’s hardship growing up, have been both inspiring and humbling for Kahmile. This is especially true regarding the educational opportunities his Grandfather had been denied. Additionally, Kahmile’s occasional visits to see his mother forged a deeper connection with his impoverished past. All of these were indispensable in developing Kahmile’s drive to secure something better through education.

After being accepted to the Leadership Center for the Sciences and Engineering (LCSE) high school specialty program, Kahmile heavily employed this heightened motivation. Kahmile began to regard academic challenges as incomparable to the obstacles he had already overcome. This motivation also enabled Kahmile to overcome the degenerative visual impairment he had been diagnosed with in sixth grade.

Since then, Kahmile has identified his passion of Mechanical Engineering due to his school’s FIRST robotics team, the advanced STEM courses he has had the opportunity to take, and constant exposure to his Grandfather’s craft. Every summer, Kahmile has opted to take advantage of several academic programs to further his career and college preparation, including Upward Bound, the NC STEM camp for VIB students, the Yale Young Global Scholars program: Applied Science and Engineering Session, and the Leadership Enterprise for a Diverse America’s Summer Institute.

Kahmile has received numerous honors, including the AP® Scholar with Distinction Award, Most Outstanding Student in Physics and Spanish, the President’s Award for Educational Excellence, and was a local finalist for the Chemistry Olympiad. He volunteered for the Horizon’s Hampton Roads summer program, of which he is an alumnus, and has tutored for his school’s peer tutoring program. He is now the Mechanical Team Captain of the school’s Robotics team and President of the Spanish Honor Society. He endeavors to pursue a degree in Mechanical Engineering initially at MIT, through to a terminal degree. Kahmile will be the first in his family to graduate from college and aims to provide the same opportunity for other disadvantaged students.

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Kinan Martin

Kinan Martin

Hometown: Charlottesville, VA

high school: Albemarle HS

college: MIT

MAJOR: Computation and Cognition

Born in Bloomington, Indiana, Kinan Martin moved between different national and international locales in his childhood ranging from North Carolina, to Syria, and Saudi Arabia before he settled in Charlottesville, Virginia. This travel experience instilled in him a love for adventure, an ability to appreciate different cultures, and a passion for learning foreign languages. In fact, his fascination with letters could be seen early in his life when, at only three years old, he gathered a crowd in his kindergarten as he wrote out the full alphabet in the sandbox.

With an African-American/Arab background, Kinan learned how to negotiate the blessings and challenges of a multicultural identity. This middleman position opened up avenues of understanding between him and other cultures, minorities, and mainstream populations as his unique background allowed him to play the role of a cultural translator. Kinan’s parents instilled in him an appreciation of cultural diversity and a passion for foreign languages as he pursued learning Arabic, Japanese, French, Russian, Chinese, and recently Tamil. This dedication paid off when he achieved the STAMP Biliteracy Seal in French and passed the highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test [N1] in the 96th percentile. Kinan has always been fascinated with languages’ ability to create cultural bridges through highlighting our differences, but above all, our similarities in the human experience.

Kinan’s other passion, engineering, avails one the opportunity to create beauty out of chaos, and conceive designs that are both functional and aesthetic. He believes that engineering should be in sync with environmental and social issues. His training at the Math, Engineering Science and Academy (MESA) at Albemarle High School endowed Kinan with the tools necessary to succeed in pursuing a degree in computer science or biomedical engineering with their immense potential in creating useful products to help people enhance their quality of life. At junior high, Kinan volunteered to tutor students with Algebra and advanced math. This was such a fulfilling experience that it propelled him to officially join the Peer Tutoring Center in his sophomore year. The patience and dedication he displayed in helping students with ADHD as well as neurotypical students in technical drawing, French, and Japanese earned Kinan the Peer Tutoring Patience Award (2016-2017).

During his academic career, Kinan competed against regional Albemarle schools in the AHS Academic Club Trivia Bowl, and has been a member of the Math Honor Society, the French Honor Society, and the Japanese Club. Additionally, he garnered several awards including: AP Scholar with Honor Award (2018), La Société Honoraire de Français Certificate (2017), Mu Alpha Theta, National High School and Two-year College Mathematics Honor Society (2017), 100 Black Men High School Scholar (2017), National Society of High School Scholars (2017), and the National Junior Honor Society (2015). His pride for earning these awards is matched only by the immense satisfaction he feels when organizing teams to help in food donations at Loaves & Fishes Food Pantry, or when volunteering at Habitat for Humanity and Helping Hands. His commitment and advocacy for these causes earned him the Albemarle County Leadership Award (2016). Kinan’s future academic and professional journeys will be guided by the same principles of excellence, by lifting others, and by passing on the torch to future Ron Brown Scholars.

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Leodson Jean Baptiste

Leodson Jean Baptiste

Hometown: Orange , NJ

high school: Orange HS

college: Stanford University

MAJOR: Computer Science

Leodson Jean Baptiste, known to friends and family as Leo, was born in Newark, NJ to Haitian immigrants. His family moved often before finally settling in Orange, NJ, where Leo and his three brothers were raised by their single mother. His experiences growing up led him towards a life of public service. He views technology and public policy outlets for bettering the world. Despite his unstable home situation, Leo was always able to excel academically. Although neither of his parents graduated with college degrees, he was encouraged to work hard in school and often took inspiration from his mother’s work ethic.

At school, Leo is the Navy Junior R.O.T.C. Commanding Officer and has learned to embody the N.J.R.O.T.C. core values: honor, courage, and commitment. Leo also works on initiatives like peer tutoring and an annual college awareness festival. He is especially passionate about STEM education and the ways in which empowers minority and low-income students. Outside of school, Leo leads the Mayor’s Youth Council, which seeks to provide young people with a voice in local government and a platform for civic engagement. Some of their most recent accomplishments include the enactment of an ordinance, working on political campaigns, and coordinating an annual anti-drug conference. Leo is vehemently against substance abuse after witnessing the negative effects it has had on his peer. He is a Youth Leader in a national anti-drug coalition and was recently named the coalition member of the year because of his exceptional work within Essex County.

Growing up, Leo was always fascinated with technology. Although his family could not afford at-home internet service or to purchase him a computer, he still took a keen interest in computer science; becoming a member of his school’s robotics team and working on open-source coding projects for nonprofits through an online web platform. During MITES (Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science), a six-week summer residential program at MIT, Leo was exposed to other high achieving minority students passionate about STEM. Being surrounded by such amazing people cemented his decision to pursue a degree in computer science. Leo is unconventional in that he would like to pursue a degree in a STEM field but ultimately sees himself working in government or the nonprofit sector. He would like to challenge the notion that engineers should not be employed in government as policy makers. During MITES, Leo learned that artificial intelligence is at a critical stage, yet AI policy has remained largely underdeveloped.

Leo has an enthusiasm for social entrepreneurship and a strong desire to create technology that does good for humanity. Ultimately, his goal is to create superintelligence that leads to solutions to significant global problems. However, in order to avoid the existential risks that are inherent to such a powerful tool, he recognizes the need to work in partnership with institutes, industry, and government. It is also important to him that everyone has access to these tools, particularly low-income and minority households.

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Madeline Wright

Madeline Wright

Hometown: San Pedro, CA

high school: San Pedro Senior HS

college: University of Chicago

MAJOR: Neuroscience, Philosophy or Psychology

Madeline Wright is an intellectually curious young woman driven by her obstacles. As the daughter of a drug addict, Madeline vividly recalls 60%, as up to 60% of children with parents who abuse drugs end up abusing drugs when they are older. But with her mother as her role model, Madeline learned to never confine to statistic. Despite overdue bills, bruised arms, and two children to raise, her mother worked daily without complaint. Watching her mother instilled that same resilience in Madeline, and she made a promise to herself to rise above her family’s actions.

At the age of nine, Madeline began spending weekends and school breaks assisting her mother at the apartment building she managed. Plumbers instructed her how to fix leaking pipes. YouTube taught her how to properly paint walls. Madeline became well-versed in plastering walls and installing carpets for the pure motive of survival. On Saturdays, she put on her best blazer to show the apartments her mother and her repaired to potential renters. Quarters earned from washer machine collections were put towards groceries for the week, and slowly, they earned enough to pay their bills.

As a means to understand his disease, Madeline began researching her father’s symptoms and fell in love with the field of neuroscience. She began to compare drug usage with brain scans and alcohol consumption with nerve activity. She spent hours researching the various effects of Benzoylmethylecgonine on the temporal lobe. Google images enabled her to distinguish a brain on methamphetamine from a brain on heroin. Madeline’s questioning of substance abuse led her to medical research, and she has been researching chemical dependency and its correlation to the human brain ever since.

Madeline continues to carry her childhood on her back, no longer as a burden, but as a reminder of how far she has come. The takeaway from her experience is not what she discovered about the actions of others; it is character. The priceless values instilled in her—her ambition, her determination, her resilience—reflect her character with greater accuracy than any statistic ever will. There is no number to label her thoughts, no percentage to quantify her aspirations. Although the flashbacks of her childhood still sting with vivid imagery, she now views them as tokens of progress. Her broken home taught her one thing: loss is inevitable and universal, but the transition of loss into inspiration is a rarity—a rarity that she possesses.

Her mind is now consumed with new numbers, numbers that lift and propel her toward success. In her spare time, Madeline established the Cabrillo Street to College Mentorship program, assisting over forty youth in college preparation. She hopes to expand her program to serve over two-hundred at-risk youth across the Los Angeles area. This fall, Madeline will study neuroscience at The University of Chicago as a first-generation student. Madeline holds the future goal joining the 5% of certified female neurosurgeons in the world and is a nationally-recognized scholar in over four organizations. Once, 60% motivated her. Now, Madeline write the statistics for her future.

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